Friday, July 31, 2015

Now That's Just Corny! Farmgirl Sisterhood Post 10

Now That's Just Corny

Mary Jane's Farmgirl Sisterhood Post 10




My favorite part of summer is visiting all of the local farms in our area. Our family especially loves corn on the cob. The sweetest corn in our area is Dunn's Sweet Corn! It is located in Leetown, West Virginia off of Route 51. Terry and Frances Dunn own Beckwith Farm - a 9-acre farm where they grow and sell their bicolored sweet corn, commonly called "peaches and cream." They farm two different varieties - Ambrosia and Serendipity. 


Corn will always have an even number of rows on each cob.
Their bicolored corn has a very short growing season - usually from the first of July through the third week in August. Although he uses staggered planting to lengthen the time of harvesting, the Ambrosia takes about 72 days to mature and the Serendipity takes approximately 85 days. Often if you are late in the day, the corn is gone. Dunn's does not have a website or any social media page. Word of mouth is their advertisement.





With the exception of Antarctica, corn is produced on every continent in the world.
Their corn is so good that even their cat eats it! This was the first time that I have ever seen a cat peel back the husk and chew on the cob. I personally like mine with hot melting butter and a tad bit of salt. Of course, there are many ways to cook corn. Lori Leigh from LL Farm has an amazing  Corn Chowder recipe! One can make it with fresh off the cob or from the can is absolutely mouth watering! 




Another advantage of visiting a local farm is the variety of photo opportunities one can take advantage of. I like the like the old tractors at Dunn's. There is something charming as the wild flowers embrace the wheels and the color of the tassels waving in the background. 









There are over 3,500 different uses for corn products.
Yet, my favorite part is sitting on the back deck or front porch shucking corn and sharing conversations. Often, it is my husband and I who are shucking the corn. We discuss the day or deeper topics. Sometimes, we sit in peace and quiet. During the calmness, I often imagine how women from the past would gather together to snap purple hull peas or shuck tables of corn spread in front of them. I wonder what sort of meaningful connections were made as they listened to each other's stories. Moreover, I imagine as each layer of husk is pulled back they reveal their inner wishes, struggles, or maybe they shared a giggle or two.



No matter how you savor the moment from visiting the farm, preparing or eating it off the cob, the experience makes the corn taste extra sweet!  



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